Healthy Neighborhood Health Plan (HNHP)

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Bland County Medical Clinic’s Healthy Neighborhood Health Plan is a health plan that is sponsored by the federal government for patients that are uninsured or underinsured based upon annual income and family size, for up to 200% of the Federal Poverty Level.

Who should apply for this health plan?

We encourage all of our patients to apply for this health plan. Application and proof of income must be submitted annually to make sure that patients still fit the eligibility factors to receive discounted medical services. This plan is available for all patients of Bland County Medical Clinic, but is subject to eligibility.

What are the Eligibility Guidelines for this health plan?

  • Patients must fill out an application. Applications are available at Bland County Medical Clinic or online at www.blandclinic.com
  • Patients must provide proof of income. The following documents may be used:
    • Federal Income Tax Return
    • Three consecutive pay stubs
    • Child support court order or letter from spouse
    • Food Stamp award letter
    • Retirement letter
    • Social Security award letter
    • Unemployment Benefit letter
    • A letter stating that you have no income

Will there be any co-payments for this health plan?

Co-payments are a reduced fee charge for services that Bland County Medical Clinic provides to patients under the Healthy Neighborhood Health Plan. Services are not free but are discounted.

If a patient has questions or concerns about co-payments, our staff is happy to help clarify. The following services will require a nominal co-payment fee:

  • Office visits
  • Labs
  • X-rays
  • Ultrasounds
  • Echocardiograms

Who can patients contact for more information?

Debbie Hull – Bland County Medical Clinic

  • Phone: 276-688-2615
  • Fax: 276-688-4336
  • 12301 Grapefield Rd, Bastian VA 24314

Vanessa Proffitt – Bland County Medical Clinic Dental Clinic

  • Phone: 276-688-4711
  • Fax: 276-688-4712
  • 8487 South Scenic Highway, Bland VA 24315

Medication Assistance Program (MAP)

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Bland County Medical Clinic’s Medication Assistance Program is sponsored by the Virginia Healthcare Foundation, for patients from economically disadvantaged areas. This program assists our patient advocates to help patients (subject to pharmaceutical company requirements) to receive free and discounted medications.  Currently there are up to 290 possible pharmaceuticals that are participating in this program.

Who should apply for this program?

We encourage all our patients to apply for this program. Application and proof of income must be submitted annually to make sure that patients still fit the eligibility factors to receive free or discounted medication. This program is available for all patients of Bland County Medical Clinic but is subject to the eligibility guidelines of each pharmaceutical company.

What are the benefits of this program?

  • Free or discounted medication to those who qualify.
  • Medications for diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.…
  • Chronic medications
  • Help for Medicare Part D patients who have hit the coverage gap (donut hole).
  • Programs offered for generic drugs

How does this program work?

  • Patients must fill out an application for the Medication Assistance Program. Applications are available at Bland County Medical Clinic or online at www.blandclinic.com
  • Patients must provide proof of income. The following documents may be used:
    • Federal Income Tax Return
    • Three consecutive pay stubs
    • Child support court order or letter from spouse
    • Food Stamp award letter
    • Retirement letter
    • Social Security award letter
    • Unemployment Benefit letter
    • A letter stating that you have no income.
  • Patient advocates will process the application through the pharmacy connection program (TPC)
  • Patient advocates will order medications that are available to you.
  • Medications will be shipped to Bland County Medical Clinic in 4-6 weeks.
  • Patients will call their patient advocate 2 – 3 weeks before running out of medications so that refills can be processed.
  • Enrollment with the pharmaceutical company is effective for one year.
  • Patient advocates can order for any provider that prescribes medication at any facility.
  • Patient advocates will call the patient when medications arrive.

Who can patients contact for more information?

Gabby Bailey – Patient Advocate

  • Phone: 276-688-0441
  • Fax: 276-688-2621
  • 12301 Grapefield Rd, Bastian VA 24314

Krista Mitchell – Patient Advocate

  • Phone: 276-688-2607
  • Fax: 276-688-2621
  • 12301 Grapefield Rd, Bastian VA 24314

Testing For Colorectal Cancer

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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.  Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States, and is the second leading cause of cancer death.  Early detection and treatment for colorectal cancer greatly improve the chance of positive medical outcomes. At Bland County Medical Clinic, we would like to take a moment to share some information from the American Cancer Society , that serves to provide information on getting screened for Colorectal Cancer.

Colorectal cancer: Should you be concerned?

If you’re 45 or older, the answer is yes.

If you’re 45 or older, you need to think about colorectal cancer. Most colon or rectal cancers occur in men and women around this age.

But no one in your family has had colorectal cancer?

Most people who get colorectal cancer have no family history of the disease. It is also possible to have colorectal cancer and not even know it. If you have a parent, brother, sister, or child who has had colon or rectal cancer, then testing is even more important for you. In fact, you may need to start testing before you’re 45.

Get tested.

Talk to your health care provider about which tests might be good options for you, and to your insurance provider about your coverage.  You have the power to help stop colorectal cancer before it starts. Colorectal cancer begins with a growth (called a poly) that is no yet cancer. Testing can help your health care provider tell whether there is a problem. When polyps are found and removed, it can keep some people from getting colorectal cancer.

What is colorectal cancer? 

Cancer of the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer.

What do the colon and rectum do?

The colon and rectum help the body digest food. They hold waste until it passes out of the body.

What tests look at the colon and rectum?

Flexible sigmoidoscopy

A narrow, lighted tube is used to look inside your rectum and lower part of the colon. The doctor will be looking for cancer or polyps that could turn into cancer. If they see something, they can take a piece of it and test it for cancer. This test allows the doctor to look at only the lower part of the colon. If any growths or polyps are found, acolonoscopy will need to be done.

Colonoscopy

A narrow, lighted tube is used to look at the inside ofthe rectum and the entire colon. The doctor will be looking for cancer or polyps that could turn into cancer. If they see any polyps or growths, they can remove it or take a piece to test it for cancer. Patients are usually given drugs to make them sleep during acolonoscopy.

CT colonography

With this test, air is pumped into your colon. Then a special type of

x-ray called a CT scan is done. The test can be done quickly and with no sedation. If a polyp or growth is found, a colonoscopy must be done to remove it or take a piece to test for cancer.

What are the stool (poop) sample tests?

Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)

Your health care provider will give you a test kit to take home. You will need to smear a small amount of your poop on a card. The cards are returned to your provider’s office or a lab to be tested. Testing will tell your provider if there is blood in your poop. If blood is present, a colonoscopy will need to be done to look for the cause of the blood. This test can help find some cancers in the colon or rectum, but it can also miss some.

Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

Your health care provider will give you a test kit to take home. You will put a small amount of your poop on a card. The kit will explain how to do this. You may have to do this on 2 or 3 cards, depending on the kindof test kit you’re given. The cards are returned to your provider’s office or a lab to

be tested. Testing will tell your provider if there is blood in your poop. If blood is found, a colonoscopy will need to be done to look for the cause of the blood. This test can help find some colorectal cancers, but it can also misssome.

Multi-targeted stool DNA test (MT-sDNA)

This test checks your poop for cancer cells. Your health care provider will give you a test kit to take home. You will collect a sample of your poop andreturn it to a lab to be tested. This test will find some colorectal cancers, but it can also miss some. If the test finds cells that maybe cancer, acolonoscopy will need to be done.

How do I prepare for these tests?

For the sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and the CT colonography, your colon will need to be cleaned out as much as possible.  You may need to have only clear liquids and no food for some time before the test.  You’ll take a strong laxative the day before the test and may need to give yourself an enema the morning of the test.

No advance preparation is needed for the stool tests. You’ll have to follow the instructions of the kit and will needto return the kits to either your provider or a lab for testing.

Which tests are best for me?

There are some differences between these tests to consider, but the most important thing is to get screened, no matter which test you choose. Talk to your health care provider about which tests might be good options for you, andto your insurance provider about your coverage.

The American Cancer Society recommends that starting at age 45 you have one of these tests:

Visual examsof the colon andrectum Flexible sigmoidoscopy* every 5 years, or Colonoscopy every 10 years, or

CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy)* every 5 years

Stool-based tests

Yearly guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT),* or Yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT),* or

Multi-targeted stool DNA test (MT-sDNA)* every 3 years

*If a person chooses to be screened witha test other than colonoscopy,any abnormal test result should be followed up with colonoscopy.

If you’re in good health, you should continue regular screening through age 75.

For people ages 76 through 85, talk with your health care provider about whether continuing to get screened is right for you. When deciding, take into account your own preferences, overall health, and past screening history.

People over 85 should no longer get colorectal cancer screening.

How can I find out more about colorectal cancer?

Asking about colorectal cancer testing isn’t always easy. We encourage all of our patients to speak with their provider about testing. The  American Cancer Society is always a good resource for any cancer related questions. They can be reached at 1-800-227-2345. They can tell you more about the tests, help you talk to your health care provider, or listen to your concerns.

Bland County Medical Clinic is a leading family medical clinic known for offering comprehensive, preventative healthcare to residents across Southwestern VA and West Virginia. If you’re looking for a friendly, experienced primary care physician that believes in quality, yet affordable healthcare for patients from all walks of life, call today at (276) 688-4331 to schedule an appointment at  our state-of-the-art facility. For more information on our specialties, from routine physicals to behavioral health and dietitian services, visit our website